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ABOUT SADIE BROCKBANK

“Sadie’s observation is deep, accurate and precise; her composition of forms, which hint at narrative but aren’t limited by it, represent an unusual talent and vision.”
Prof Michael Shaw

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“Sadie's work in two and three dimensions is full of the Spirit of the Animals. Her beautiful pieces evoked for me so many of the folk tales which I used to read, and shadows of which haunt the recesses of my memory.”
Olga Norris - http://threadingthoughts.blogspot.co.uk/2016/11/tell-me-story.html

“While growing up paper, paints, glue and scissors were always readily available. This kind of mess wasn’t mess. It was absolutely allowed and encouraged, and as a result, my brother and I were often to be found in the kitchen, either on or under the table, busy making and drawing. I think this is why I feel a strong connection between the creative processes that I am now engaged in and with my early experiences of play. Indeed, playfulness itself is a prerequisite - a tool for exploration.”

Sadie Brockbank graduated with honours from Falmouth School of Art in 1987, where she studied Painting. However her paintings rapidly became more and more three dimensional, with birds and beasts protruding from the canvasses.

Following college Sadie’s work moved more fully into the arena of Sculpture, building with wood and plaster for a series of sculptures finished with coloured and patterned textile surfaces. She joined ‘The 62 Group’, an organisation of textile artists, and exhibited at various venues including ‘Out of the Frame’ a show at the Crafts Council in September 1992.

Subsequently Sadie became interested in the lost wax process of bronze casting and produced a series of mythical figurative sculptures.

Her use of ‘other worldly’ figures aims to take the viewer beyond representation, and thus ‘confuse the logical mind’ in an attempt to invoke a spirit of introspection and question. The figures are often in relationships of interdependence and cooperation.

On the process of creation she says: “I am seeking to attain a vitality and tension in the movement of the piece. As I work I keep my attention on the progress, watching for that moment when the piece begins to take on its own presence. I then allow it to progress down its own path, kind of listening to it, perhaps flowing more from the subconscious than the conscious mind. So I am striving to be open to the drama of the work before me. The challenge is to remain sensitive to the direction as it unfolds.”

Sadie continues to work in a variety of mediums; bronze, bronze resin, mixed media, including papier mache and pulp, plaster and jezmonite: “Moving between different mediums helps me to maintain a feeling of discovery and immediacy when I am working. It keeps play alive”.

Sadie is a frequent participant of the Open Studios scheme in West Berkshire, and has exhibited widely in the south of England, at both Art Fairs and Galleries, including the Royal Academy’s Summer Exhibition.